Last edited by Shakora
Saturday, April 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry found in the catalog.

kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry

Merwe Scholtz

kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry

  • 218 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Blackwell in Oxford .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • English language -- Old English, ca. 450-1100 -- Figures of speech.,
  • English poetry -- Old English, ca. 450-1100 -- History and criticism.,
  • Icelandic and Old Norse poetry -- History and criticism.

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPE241 .M4
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 p.l., 180 p., 1 l.
    Number of Pages180
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18975542M


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kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry by Merwe Scholtz Download PDF EPUB FB2

THE USE OF KENNINGS IN ANGLO-SAXON LITERATURE The kenning was an interesting literary technique used by ancient Anglo-Saxon poets for many centuries.

Kennings were first used as synonyms. Alliteration in Old Norse works required that File Size: 80KB. Kenning, concise compound or figurative phrase replacing a common noun, kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry book in Old Germanic, Old Norse, and Old English poetry.

A kenning is commonly a simple stock compound such as “whale-path” or “swan road” for “sea,” “God’s beacon” for “sun,” or “ring-giver” for “king.”. 49 rows  A kenning (Old Norse kenning [cʰɛnːiŋɡ], Kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry book Icelandic [cʰɛnːiŋk]) is a circumlocution.

The Poet's Vision: An Overview of the Kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse-Icelandic Poetry. Get this from a library. The kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry. [H v d M Scholtz]. ANGLO-SAXON/ NORSE/OLD NORSE KENNINGS: Sky CandleThe Sun Swan RoadThe Sea Stout HeartedBrave Battle SweatBlood Light of BattleSword Helmet.

Kennings in the Community and Poets on Viking Poetry As a poet in both English and Old Norse, I love kennings and teach about them.

This blog is written and maintained by members of the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge. We study the history, languages, literatures and material culture of medieval Author: Anglo-Saxon, Norse, And Celtic. Kennings are metaphoric terms used in place of nouns.

They are common in Old Norse, Icelandic, and Old English (Anglo-Saxon) poetry, and usually use either a hyphen (e.g. “ring-giver” as a term for king) or a possessive (e.g.

“swan’s road” as a term for kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry book. In Beowulf you find many kennings for king, including: Ring-giver; Treasure-giver. Kenning history: Kennings are also ancient, but apparently started further north because some of the oldest kennings appear in the work of the skalds, or Norse poets.

Such kennings appear to be closely related to Anglo-Saxon kennings. For instance, the kenning "sea-steed" for "ship" appears in both Norse and Anglo-Saxon poetry. Kennings Kennings were originally written in Old Kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry book or Old Norse.

A kenning describes something familiar in an uncommon way, without using its name. The poem usually takes the form of a list – and each depiction of the object is two words. Kennings, as I explained in my earlier post, are metaphoric terms used in place of nouns. They are common in Old Norse, Icelandic, and Old Kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry book (Anglo-Saxon) poetry, and usually use either a hyphen (e.g.

“ring-giver” as a term for king) or a possessive (e.g. “swan’s road” as a. Kenning in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse poetry Utrecht, Nijmegen, N.v. Dekker & van de Vegt en J.W. van Leeuwen, (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: H v d M Scholtz; Rijksuniversiteit te Utrecht.

Kennings were commonly used in Anglo-Saxon and Norse poetry to rename and describe something or someone. In fact, there are many kennings used in the epic poem Beowulf. Now modern poetry inspired by or imitative of Old Norse poetry often makes use of kennings and kenning-like constructions, as you can see for example on the excellent Kennings in the Community website.

But these are all made by people with at least some acquaintance with the Old Norse tradition and, in their quest to write good modern poetry Author: Viqueen. A Stvdy of the Kennings in Anglo Saxon Poetry. and arrange from most of the Anglo-Saxon poems many ken- nings (but not all) for fifty-four well selected representative conceptions.

Of these kennings he found aboutwhich oc- cur altogether some times. Kennings are metaphorical compound words, and they were used to great extent in Old English and Old Norse poetry. They function as a way to make an ordinary noun more descriptive or awe inspiring.

You can leave a responsewe're approaching kenning territory. Modern Kennings While kennings are most common and noticeable in Old English and Norse poetry, at pm.

One of the most dramatic instances of the use of a malign spell in Anglo-Saxon literature is / Kennings were commonly used in Anglo-Saxon and Norse poetry to rename and describe something or someone. In fact, there are many kennings used in the epic poem Beowulf. One.

A kenning (Old Norse kenning, plural kenningar) is a stylistic device that was commonly used in Old Norse poetry. It’s a form of periphrasis (referring to something indirectly) that uses images from a body of traditional lore to designate something rather than calling it by its everyday name. A kenning (Old Norse: kenning, Modern Icelandic pronunciation: Template:IPA-is) is a type of literary trope, specifically circumlocution, in the form of a compound (usually two words, often hyphenated) that employs figurative language in place of a more concrete single-word gs are strongly associated with Old Norse and later Icelandic and Anglo-Saxon poetry.

Kennings are strongly associated with Old Norse-Icelandic and Old English poetry. They continued to be a feature of Icelandic poetry (including rímur) for centuries, together with the closely related heiti. A kenning has two parts: a base-word (also known as a head-word) and a determinant.

Kennings is a figurative, usually compound, expression used in place of a name or noun, especially in Old English and Old Norse poetry. This element is found within most Anglo-Saxon works in order to provide variety in the literature and keep the correct number of syllables in each line.

Anglo-Saxon riddles Examples of riddles and answers. Anglo-Saxon riddles Discussion and two examples of Anglo-Saxon riddles. Kennings Scholarly definition and examples.

List of Kennings A list of 50 kennings drawn from Norse literature. Kennings are a compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning.

So basically it's two words to create an adjective in place of a noun. How do you create a kenning. Take the word "police" for example. Then think of words associated with the list you made and the word given and you've created a kenning.

Old English literature, or Anglo-Saxon literature, encompasses literature written in Old English, in Anglo-Saxon England from the 7th century to the decades after the Norman Conquest of "Cædmon's Hymn", composed in the 7th century, according to Bede, is often considered as the oldest surviving poem in written in the midth century represents some of the latest post.

Be your own skáld. If you've ever wanted to try your hand at writing your own poem in the true Viking style, or just want to appreciate Norse poetry more deeply, this guide will show you how it's.

One of the things that makes Old English poetry unique is the use of kennings, a linguistic feature that is most popular in Old English and Norse, where instead of simply saying a word, you allude to it in a roundabout and clever way, typically in the form of two hyphenated words.

The poem has three lines and 17 syllables in total in the pattern of 5,7,5. Imagery: use of language to create a vivid image- often visual. Internal rhyme: placement of rhyming words within a line of poetry. Kenning: a compound expression use in old English and Norse poetry, which named something without using its name e.g.

mouse catcher= cat. Kennings are often used in poetry for effect. A kenning is the process of using a two-word phrase in the place of a one-word noun. Kennings were first used in Anglo-Saxon and Norse poetry.

The famous Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf uses many kennings, for example: Body – bone-house. Sword – battle-light. Ship – wave-floater. Sea – whale-road. A 10th-century book or codex which is an anthology of Anglo-Saxon poetry Exeter book A compound expression in Old English and Old Norse poetry with metaphorical meaning (compound metaphor).

These "clues" in turn suggest the Anglo-Saxon/ Old Norse kenning, reminding us that Morgan was a fine translator of Beowulf. The kenning, a metaphorical compound-word or Author: Carol Rumens. A line of Anglo-Saxon poetry commonly includes all the following except.

At least two kennings. A characteristic of both the anglo-saxon and old Norse languages that posed problems for was. limited vocabulary. using kennings gave oral poets the opportunity to.

think ahead as they composed. A kenning (derived from Old Norse) is a type of circumlocution, in the form of compound that employs figurative language in place of a more concrete single-word noun. Kennings are strongly associated with Old Norse and later Icelandic and Anglo-Saxon poetry.

They usually consist of two words, and are often hyphenated. For example, Old Norse poets might replace sverð, the regular word for. Kennings synonyms, Kennings pronunciation, Kennings translation, English dictionary definition of Kennings. A figurative, usually compound expression used in place of a name or noun, especially in Old English and Old Norse poetry; for example, storm of swords.

Anglo Saxon dialect words form the basis of the language we now call Old English, and approximately one third of Anglo-Saxon vocabulary still survives into modern English. About Anglo Saxon texts live on from this era, including many beautiful poems. Many of these tell of wild battles and heroic journeys.

After encountering visually stunning examples of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts and engaging with the literary conventions of Anglo-Saxon poetry, students will be prepared to study Beowulf. Dispelling stereotypes about the so-called “dark ages,” this lesson helps students learn about the production of early manuscripts and the conventions of Anglo-Saxon poetry, solve online riddles, and write.

A kenning is actually instead of a name, rather than in addition to (as I just discovered by looking it up with excessive help from Catzilla): "a figurative, usually compound expression used in place of a name or noun, especially in Old English and Old Norse poetry; for example, storm of swords is a kenning for battle.".

mrissa: Also. The word kenning is derived from the Old Norse phrase kenna. The poem, like much other Anglo-Saxon poetry, links pagan and Christian values in an uneasy combination. The Seafarer A man should think about his earthly life, focus on the heavenly home that awaits him, and how to get there.

Old Norse and Anglo-Saxon poetry depended heavily on alliteration, but neither language had a large vocabulary. Poets created the alliterative words they needed by combining existing words. Because the poetry was oral and had to be memorized, bards valued ready-made phrases.

Kennings based on the names of Germanic/Norse deities. This page could be lengthened immeasurably. "Heimdallr's head" is a sword, "ship of Ullr" is a shield. Odin has very many associated to him as well. Nagelfar7 August (UTC) Yeah, it even lacks my favorite kenning, Yggdrasil. Like Old Norse poetry, Anglo-Saxon pdf makes great use of "kennings." This is a device which conveys meaning through the use of established metaphor—for example, "whale road" is .The proper definition of the word “kenning,” according to The Download pdf English Dictionary is “One of the periphrastic expressions used instead of the simple name of a thing, characteristic of old Teutonic and especially Old Norse poetry” (Oxford ).

The Oxford English Dictionary also gives two examples of a kenning. The first kenning is.Old Norse poetry has many metrical ebook. They range from the relatively simple fornyrðislag ebook the deeply complex dróttkvætt, the "courtly metre".

In Eddic poetry, the metric structures are generally simple, and are almost invariably ljóðaháttr or fornyrðislag. Ljóðaháttr, (known also as the "metre of chants"), because of its structure, which comprises broken stanzas, lends itself.